Friday, June 24, 2016

And there it is. It's all about the meter feeders.

I called it. Thanks to Nick M., the true reason behind the parking sensors is below in his email exchange with Mt. Lebanon Director of Finance Andrew McCreery.

Mr. Meduho,

Responses to your questions.

Regarding the Streetline company and the associated apps/programs that come with it, how much is this costing Mt. Lebanon?

The current 95 sensors are $14/month per sensor. There is a current expansion being installed yesterday and today, with and additional 74 sensors. When they are activated, all sensors will be $13/month per sensor. The term of the contract runs through 8/31/17.

When did we start paying for this? Is this a monthly subscription? Can you please offer some information regarding Streetline.

We began with a pilot program at the beginning 2015. The program started September 2015. As a reminder, this program is funded through parking fees and is not supported in any way by the General Fund (tax dollars).

Regards.

Andrew

****************
In a separate email,

Mr. Meduho,

Responses to your questions.

Are we using the Streetline data to help with parking violations and/or enforcement? And if so, how?

Yes. We are using the Streetline enforcement application to help guide our enforcement of two hour violations. We successfully integrated the real time reporting with our meter vendor for expired meter violations, but determined the data requests were too cumbersome for the individual batteries on the meters. We were replacing too many batteries to make it cost effective. Therefore, we ceased the expired meter component.

Also, who can I ask for the data? Who is overseeing this.

As with all requests for specific data, you may submit a right to know request. The data is being analyzed and overseen by a combination of the finance department and parking enforcement. We review the data quarterly.
Thank you,

Andrew

5 comments:

E. T. Gillen said...

I need some help from the computer geeks. Would Streetline potentially be able to send information to MTL about who downloaded their parking app? In other words, could their analytics capture info from the app downloads?
Elaine

E. T. Gillen said...

Our municipality is made up of lazy thugs. They are cracking down on jaywalking, meter feeders, and people who ask too many questions and should get answers from Right To Knows which were granted to the them. They protected the thug who charged us thousands of dollars for violating health department codes when the deer were being killed. Folks, it wasn't about killing deer. The guy was a crook.

Mt. Lebanon residents, are you getting it yet?
Elaine

Anonymous said...

Doing some quick math, the sensors themselves will cost the parking fund $26,364 per year.

I wonder if they're expecting $26,364 more in citations to pay just for the sensors.

Nick M.

E. T. Gillen said...

If they are cracking down on the people who are violating the two hour parking limit by feeding the meters, there is no lost revenue. They're just going after the low hanging fruit. Why aren't they going after speeders?
Elaine

Lena Horne said...

The City of Pittsburgh instituted a parking sensor system some years ago under the Murphy administration. The sensors were installed only in certain sections of the city. They were not used in downtown Pittsburgh. Needless to say, the sensors were unpopular. I'm not sure what happened to them in the long run. They may still be in parts of the city. What I do know is that after the first round were installed, the project was canned. At that time, there were department stores in downtown. People shopped there. The sensors would have resulted in harm to businesses and would seem unwelcoming to downtown shoppers. Thus, they never went through with putting any sensors in downtown Pittsburgh.